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Open Journal of Psychiatry & Allied Sciences
Year : 2019, Volume : 10, Issue : 1
First page : ( 68) Last page : ( 72)
Print ISSN : 2394-2053. Online ISSN : 2394-2061.
Article DOI : 10.5958/2394-2061.2019.00018.1

Mood, motor, and speech abnormalities in schizophrenia, mania, and other psychotic disorders: a comparative analysis

Bhuyan Dhrubajyoti1,*, Chaudhury Pranit Kumar2, Saikia Hiranya3

1Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Assam Medical College, Dibrugarh, Assam, India

2Former Professor and Head, Department of Psychiatry, Assam Medical College, Dibrugarh, Assam, India

3Senior Lecturer, Biostatistics, Department of Community Medicine, Assam Medical College, Dibrugarh, Assam, India

*Correspondence Dr. Dhrubajyoti Bhuyan, Department of Psychiatry, Assam Medical College, Dibrugarh‑ 786002, Assam, India. dr.dhrubajyoti@gmail.com

Online published on 16 January, 2019.

Abstract

Background

Although schizophrenia is conceptualised as psychosis that affects predominantly thought and, mania that affects mood, careful observation of the psychopathology indicates that there is considerable overlap of mood, motor, and speech abnormalities between various psychotic disorders.

Aims

This study aimed to examine the nature and types of mood, motor, and speech abnormalities present in schizophrenia, mania, and other psychotic disorders and, compare the nature of these abnormalities.

Method

In total, 90 patients (divided equally between three study groups) were recruited for study participation via systematic random sampling. Mood, motor, and speech abnormalities were assessed using the Present State Examination, version 10 in the Schedule for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry.

Results

Rates of expansive and irritable mood in patients with mania were significantly higher relative to those observed in patients with schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. However, other symptoms such as reduced sleep and socially embarrassing behaviour did not differ significantly between the three groups. Rates of bizarre and irrelevant behaviour, poor personal hygiene and habits observed in patients with schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders were higher relative to those observed in patients with mania. Rates of blunting and flattening of affect in patients with schizophrenia were significantly higher relative to those observed in mania and other psychotic disorders.

Conclusion

Although the frequency with which some abnormalities were observed was significantly higher in some psychotic disorders, others such as neglect of common dangers and socially embarrassing behaviour did not differ significantly between the three groups.

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Keywords

Psychopathology, Behaviour, Affect.

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