(3.236.253.192)
Users online: 1778    [ij] [ij] [ij] 
Email id
 

Journal of Veterinary Parasitology
Year : 2012, Volume : 26, Issue : 2
First page : ( 151) Last page : ( 155)
Print ISSN : 0971-6157. Online ISSN : 0974-0813.

Prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths in small ruminants of low altitude subtropical zone of Jammu province

Khajuria J.K., Katoch Rajesh, Yadav Anish, Godara R., Singh Ajitpal

Division of Veterinary Parasitology, S.K.U.A.S.T., Jammu (R.S. Pura), India

Online published on 13 August, 2013.

Abstract

Examination of 1920 faecal samples of small ruminants (sheep-960 & goats-960) revealed 75.10% animals positive for helminthic infection either by direct smear or by concentration methods. The different ova observed in descending order were of strongyles (57.86%), amphistomes (21.14%), Trichuris spp. (14.53%), Fasciola spp. (5.62%), Strongyloides spp. (4.16%), Dicrocoelium spp. (3.90%) and anoplocephalids (2.06%). The rate of infection in both the species (sheep, 75.83% and goats, 74.38%) was almost similar and attributed to mixed grazing and sharing of pastures/sheds. Infection was significantly (p<0.05) higher in monsoon as compared to winter (64.38%). Although strongyles were predominant in all the seasons, but significantly (p<0.05) higher infection was observed in monsoon season as compared to winter. Coproculture studies showed Haemonchus contortus to be the most predominant species during all the seasons. Quantitative analysis of faecal samples revealed highest EPG (sheep 2103.33 ± 82.68 and goats 1883 ± 85.11) during monsoon and lowest during winter (sheep 763.33 ± 58.91 and goats 683.3 ± 64.23). Two peaks of EPG (one during April and the second during August) were recorded in the study. EPG was significantly (p<0.05) more in young animals (< 1 year) as compared to adults (>1 year) irrespective of host and season. Nematode infection was significantly (p<0.05) higher (81.45%) in young animals as compared to adults (68.75%). In both the species infection rate was higher (81.25%) in females as compared to males (68.95%).

Top

Keywords

Epidemiology, Sheep, Goats, Helminths.

Top

  
║ Site map ║ Privacy Policy ║ Copyright ║ Terms & Conditions ║ Page Rank Tool
520,609,939 visitor(s) since 30th May, 2005.
All rights reserved. Site designed and maintained by DIVA ENTERPRISES PVT. LTD..
Note: Please use Internet Explorer (6.0 or above). Some functionalities may not work in other browsers.