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Journal of Animal Research
Year : 2012, Volume : 2, Issue : 1
First page : ( 53) Last page : ( 60)
Print ISSN : 2249-5290. Online ISSN : 2277-940X.

Effect of probiotic and Phytobiotics on feed conversion ratio, carcass quality traits and development of digestive organs of commercial broilers

Tiwari Mahendra1, Bhattacharyya Amitav2,*, Singh H.N.3

Pandit Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Pashu Chikitsa Vigyan Vishwavidyalaya, Evam Gau Anusandhan Sansthan, Mathura, Uttar Pradesh (India)

*Corressponding Author: Email: amitav16@rediffmail.com

Present address: 1Department of Poultry Science, DUVASU, Mathura

2Department of Poultry Science, DUVASU, Mathura

3Former Professor and Head, Department of Poultry Science, DUVASU, Mathura

Online published on 27 July, 2012.

Abstract

One hundred and eighty one week old broiler chickens were distributed into three experimental groups having three replicates of twenty birds each. The birds of the first group were fed a basal diet supplemented with probiotic (Biovet YC@50g/quintal of the basal diet) while the second group birds were fed a basal diet supplemented with phytobiotics (1% amla pulp powder, 0.5% turmeric powder, 0.5% neem leaf powder). The third group was fed a control/basal diet. The chicks were offered basal diet containing 22.5% CP and 2830 kcal ME/kg diet up to the age of 6 weeks. Feed conversion ratio (FCR) was apparently better in the phytobiotics supplemented group compared to the probiotic and control group during 4–6 week (2.5 vs. 2.65 and 2.71) and 1–6 week period (2.38 vs. 2.42 and 2.47). Percentage of gizzard was significantly higher (P<0.05) in the phytobiotics group (2.14) compared to the control (1.80) and probiotic fed group (1.77). Further, percent wing was significantly higher (P<0.01) in the control (13.48) and phytobiotics supplemented group (12.68) compared to the probiotic fed group (10.77). However, no such difference was noted in the other carcass quality traits. Length of the small intestine and average caecal length was significantly higher (P<0.05) in the control group compared to the probiotic and phytobiotics supplemented group. However, no such difference was found in the development of the other digestive organs. Hence, it may be concluded that phytobiotics (0.5% turmeric powder, 0.5% neem leaf powder and 1% amla pulp powder) may be fed for better performance in commercial broilers.

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Keywords

Probiotic, Phytobiotics, FCR, Carcass quality, Broilers.

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