(54.82.93.116)
Users online: 2012    [ij] [ij] [ij] 
Email id
 

International Journal of Dental and Medical Specialty
Year : 2014, Volume : 1, Issue : 2
First page : ( 27) Last page : ( 32)
Print ISSN : 2350-0921. Online ISSN : 2394-4196.
Article DOI : 10.5958/2394-4196.2014.00007.7

Management of Empty Scrotum (Cryptorchidism) in Childrens: Testicular or Scrotum Abnormality (Review)

Musa Muhammad Ujudud*

Department of Surgery, Federal Medical Centre, Katsina, P.M.B 2121, Katsina State, Nigeria

*Address for correspondence: Dr. Muhammad Ujudud Musa, Department of Surgery, Federal Medical Centre, Katsina, P.M.B 2121, Katsina State, Nigeria. Tel.: +234-8036005365. E-mail: ujudud@gmail.com

Online published on 21 February, 2015.

Abstract

Cryptorchidism (translated hidden testis) is the most common genital abnormality of childhood, refers to the incomplete descent of the testicle into dependent scrotum. The undescended testicles (UT) can be located anywhere along the path of regular descent between the kidney and just outside of scrotal inlet. It is also known as UT because the majority of testicles that do not migrate completely into the scrotum by birth can be palpable in different areas like in the inguinal region. It affects approximately 30% of baby boys born prematurely and about 4% born at term. As a baby boy grows inside mother’s womb, his testicles are typically formed inside his abdomen and move down (descend) into the scrotum shortly before birth. However in some cases, that move or descent does not occur, and the baby is born with a condition known as UT (or cryptorchidism). Almost 1 in every 100 male children born will have an empty scrotum. It may be on one side or both sides of the scrotum.

Top

Keywords

Children, cryptorchidism, scrotum, undescended testes.

Top

  
║ Site map ║ Privacy Policy ║ Copyright ║ Terms & Conditions ║ Page Rank Tool
342,980,066 visitor(s) since 30th May, 2005.
All rights reserved. Site designed and maintained by DIVA ENTERPRISES PVT. LTD..
Note: Please use Internet Explorer (6.0 or above). Some functionalities may not work in other browsers.